EmailDiscussions.com  

Go Back   EmailDiscussions.com > Discussions about Email Services > Email Comments, Questions and Miscellaneous
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Stay in touch wirelessly

Email Comments, Questions and Miscellaneous Share your opinion of the email service you're using. Post general email questions and discussions that don't fit elsewhere.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 29 Oct 2016, 10:03 AM   #1
atikovi
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 62
Mail.com notification of spam messages, but cant access them?

I have the premium service from Mail.com. In the last month or so they have a new service where I get a message in my spam folder from Mail.com saying that I have new email in my spam folder. It lists the From: and the Subject: of the emails but there is no way to click on the list of emails to read them. I see one that is from an Ebay seller and is a return address label but I have no way to access it. (It only seems to group together messages from Ebay as I get spam messages individually from other senders.) Anyone have this problem and how can I read the message?

http://www.fototime.com/C28E1FF983155F7/large.jpg
atikovi is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 30 Oct 2016, 05:25 AM   #2
n5bb
Intergalactic Postmaster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Irving, Texas
Posts: 7,905
I do not have an account at mail.com, but there are some clues in your post.
  • The mail.com support web pages and the image you posted describe how this is supposed to work:
    https://support.mail.com/email/spam-.../settings.html
  • If you choose to activate the first and last choices on the Mail Security page, a spam filter moves any suspicious messages to the Spam folder on the mail.com email server. Then when a POP3 email client accesses your account, once per day a status report (such as you posted in the image) will be sent to you.
  • POP3 email clients (in most cases) can't access any folders on the email server. All they can do is download messages from the Inbox on the server.
  • So when spam messages are automatically moved to the Spam folder on the server, there is no way for the POP3 email client to view those spam messages. That's why you get a status report -- it informs you that you need to log into webmail from time to time to be sure that good messages haven't been accidentally filed as spam.
  • So you should see the 22 spam messages in your Spam folder when you use mail.com webmail. You can't view them in a POP3 client, only a client using IMAP (which understands server-side folders).
Bill
n5bb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 Oct 2016, 05:39 AM   #3
atikovi
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 62
Don't know what a POP3 email client is but I always view and create messages online. Regardless, I think the problem is that I have a second email address with mail.com that automatically sends those messages to my main email address. I logged into that second account and found those messages in it's spam folder.
atikovi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 Oct 2016, 05:50 AM   #4
n5bb
Intergalactic Postmaster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Irving, Texas
Posts: 7,905
There are two ways to read your email:
  • Website: You use a web browser to log into your email provider and read your mail online.
  • Email client: This is a program which runs on a PC or device (such as an iOS or Android device (such as an iPhone or other smartphone or pad). The client can use either POP3 or IMAP protocols to connect to your email service (mail.com). You can then read messages offline if you wish.
If you use the mail.com Mail Collector to pull messages from one account to another, it acts as a POP3 email client:
https://support.mail.com/email/setti...ilcollect.html

Bill
n5bb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 Oct 2016, 09:19 AM   #5
atikovi
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 62
OK, I've always for over 20 years, used the website to read my email. What's advantage of this email client? The computer is always online when it's turned on so being offline isn't an issue, plus I can access it anywhere in the world.
atikovi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 30 Oct 2016, 10:53 AM   #6
n5bb
Intergalactic Postmaster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Irving, Texas
Posts: 7,905
Arrow Email clients (IMAP and POP3)

I also nearly always use web access for email. But email started before the Internet and websites existed. Networks and email servers were popular years before users could get to their email with a web browser.

The advantage of an email client is that you can create and read messages without a working Internet connection at that moment. An example would be flying on an airplane. You synchronize your email client before you get on the aircraft, then in flight you can take out your laptop PC or mobile phone or pad device and read and write messages. When you land and can connect to the Internet again, you synchronize your email client to the server again and all messages queued for sending in your outbox are sent and new incoming messages arrive. If you are limited to web access for your email, you can't do anything with your email while you can't connect to the Internet.

In the early years of email use there was another issue with email servers which had very little storage. In that situation you connected using the POP3 protocol and all messages were removed from the server and transferred to your PC. So the only long-term storage for your emails was on your PC, which moved the cost of the storage to the end user (when storage was expensive). Now storage is very cheap, and it's easy to leave email on the server. IMAP is an email client-to-server communication standard which has largely replaced POP3 for email clients. IMAP allows the client to read multiple folders on the email server, and your local client folders are synchronized with server folders. So you can choose to have multiple copies of each message you receive or send -- one on the server and another copy on each IMAP client which periodically synchronizes with the server.

Both POP3 and IMAP based email clients can also send messages using a different protocol (SMTP).

Bill
n5bb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 5 Jan 2017, 03:37 AM   #7
Steven Avery
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 35
desktop email clients - can be favored for features and speed

Some people prefer the features and speed of desktop email clients as well. How they do searching,sorting, filtering, adding mailboxes, the composing editors and other reasons.

In my case,I have used Eudora for about 20 years, and also play with TheBat!. I only compose email online (e.g. Gmail) in special situations.

I recently archived over 50 GB of email (largely forum stuff.)
Since it was simply going to stay on a hard disc on a Windows puter, the space and searching remains easy, and there was little need to spend hours on review and deletion.

I just bumped into another thread on this topic, after I started to answer.

Steven

Last edited by Steven Avery : 5 Jan 2017 at 04:24 AM.
Steven Avery is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +9. The time now is 09:54 AM.

 

Copyright EmailDiscussions.com 1998-2013. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy