EmailDiscussions.com  

Go Back   EmailDiscussions.com > Miscellaneous > The Off-Topic Lounge
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read
Stay in touch wirelessly

The Off-Topic Lounge APPROPRIATE FAMILY-FRIENDLY TOPICS ONLY - READ THE RULES!
This forum is for posting anything (excluding topics prohibited by the forum rules) that's unrelated to email. General discussions, in other words.

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 16 Sep 2018, 08:57 AM   #1
webecedarian
Essential Contributor
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: NYC
Posts: 337
The new-fangled things called "search engines"

I thought some of you might get a smile out of this. I found an article from 1998, with a run-down of some of the biggest and latest search engines:

Alta Vista
Eblast
Excite
Go To
HotBot
InfoSeek
Lycos
Mining Co
Northern Light
Snap
Yahoo
webecedarian is offline   Reply With Quote

Old 16 Sep 2018, 09:49 AM   #2
Bamb0
Master of the @
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,317
Some of those are still round
Bamb0 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 Sep 2018, 10:33 PM   #3
Tsunami
The "e" in e-mail
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: in between the bright lights and the far unlit unknown
Posts: 2,151
Only AltaVista, Lycos and Yahoo sound familiar to me. I wouldn't have a clue which ones are still active (except for Yahoo obviously) ; says a lot about how Google has a near-monopoly when it comes to search engines in most areas of the world.
Tsunami is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 Sep 2018, 04:52 AM   #4
germansaram
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Europe
Posts: 7
I especially like the title ... crazy how fast technologies are developing
germansaram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 Sep 2018, 06:51 AM   #5
somdcomputerguy
Cornerstone of the Community
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Rupert, WV
Posts: 552
Quote:
Originally Posted by germansaram View Post
I especially like the title ... crazy how fast technologies are developing
Soon people may start talking about a thing that'll be called 'email' or something..
somdcomputerguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 Sep 2018, 08:29 AM   #6
Tsunami
The "e" in e-mail
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: in between the bright lights and the far unlit unknown
Posts: 2,151
Quote:
Originally Posted by somdcomputerguy View Post
Soon people may start talking about a thing that'll be called 'email' or something..
I don't see that happening Ö I don't see email disappear anytime in the forseeable future.

That said, many people on this forum have known the days when 4 MB inboxes were considered big... That sounds like talking about the mediŽval times probably to the new generation of internet users!
Tsunami is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 Sep 2018, 08:34 AM   #7
somdcomputerguy
Cornerstone of the Community
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Rupert, WV
Posts: 552
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsunami View Post
That said, many people on this forum have known the days when 4 MB inboxes were considered big... That sounds like talking about the mediŽval times probably to the new generation of internet users!
Away from email a bit, computers in general: I remember my dad telling me about 4k memory 'chips' he repaired. By wrapping wire around a core stick..
somdcomputerguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 Sep 2018, 12:18 PM   #8
n5bb
Intergalactic Postmaster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Irving, Texas
Posts: 8,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by somdcomputerguy View Post
Away from email a bit, computers in general: I remember my dad telling me about 4k memory 'chips' he repaired. By wrapping wire around a core stick..
I think you must be referring to magnetic core memory planes:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic-core_memory

I used computers which made use of core memory in the 1970ís and also managed technicians repairing systems containing such memory. The actual repair of the core memory planes themselves (the cores and associated wiring) was a specialized job which required training, a steady hand, a microscope, and special tools. By the mid-1970ís the price and performance of semiconductor memory (static TTL RAM and dynamic MOS RAM) replaced magnetic core memory for new projects.

The early MOS dynamic RAM chips contained only 1,024 memory bits. So 1 M bytes of such memory would have required 8,000 of those ICís! A minor breakthrough happened when the MOSTEK 4116 dynamic memory chips were introduced with 16 k bits of memory.
http://smithsonianchips.si.edu/augarten/p50.htm

Bill
n5bb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 Sep 2018, 12:27 PM   #9
somdcomputerguy
Cornerstone of the Community
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Rupert, WV
Posts: 552
Quote:
Originally Posted by n5bb View Post
I think you must be referring to magnetic core memory planes:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic-core_memory
Yeppers. I just heard a few stories and didn't see the hardware, this was before my first 'computer birthday', but it's probably 100% right on!

Bruce
somdcomputerguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 Sep 2018, 09:02 PM   #10
germansaram
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Europe
Posts: 7
Do you guys also feel old when the younger generation realizes those saving symbols actually used to exist?
germansaram is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 Sep 2018, 09:32 AM   #11
n5bb
Intergalactic Postmaster
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Irving, Texas
Posts: 8,379
Quote:
Originally Posted by germansaram View Post
Do you guys also feel old when the younger generation realizes those saving symbols actually used to exist?
You mean the floppy drive icon? Here are more outdated icons:
  • Envelope icon for email.
  • Open envelope top icon for Inbox.
  • File storage box for archive folder.
  • Paper airplane for Sent folder.
  • Folder icon for file folders.
When I first used computers (long before the PC was introduced) there were several data storage media available before floppy disk and what we think of as hard drives were developed:Floppy disks were introduced in the early 1970's and initially had a diameter of 8 inches. By the late 1970's the 5.25 inch diameter floppy disk was introduced. It was essentially identical to an 8 inch floppy except for the size. These were truly floppy disks in that the outer protective envelope was floppy (as well as the rotating magnetic disk). By the late 1980's the 3.5 inch floppy disk was popular. It used a hard plastic case with a metal protective slider so the user didn't actually see the floppy magnetic disk inside the casing.

Bill
n5bb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +9. The time now is 04:19 AM.

 

Copyright EmailDiscussions.com 1998-2013. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy