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Old 19 Sep 2021, 06:41 PM   #16
chrisretusn
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Originally Posted by TenFour View Post
I'm pretty sure that Naval navigators still learn celestial navigation.
Yeah I agree they probably to learn the skill or at least introduced to it. I retired in 2003 on the USS Juneau with 22 years of sea duty. One rarely sees anyone practicing celestial navigation on the bridge any more. In fact paper navigational charts, while still in use are being replace by the electronic variety. While I was on active duty there was always a chart on the chart table on the bridge. Several years ago I paid a visit to a US Navy vessel (a friend was stationed on it) that happen to be in port where I live, I noted there was no chart table on the bridge. I asked about it, the still have to maintain current charts but no long use them (my friend was a Quarter Master. Clang! (Sound of my jaw hit the desk) We had to save them and turned them in as a matter of record, like our deck logs. Records are saved electronically now.

Oh, on mechanical watches. I've never been able to wear one. They always freeze up after a few days. Even tried resorting to a pocket watch, same issue.
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Old 19 Sep 2021, 07:47 PM   #17
TenFour
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I'm a sailor and I will be using paper charts until I am gone. Sure, I use electronic charting too, but on a small boat there is always the possibility of losing all power and electronics are never reliable. Plus, with a paper chart you can see at once a large geographic area in great detail, but with a small electronic screen you are very limited in how much you can see at once unless you zoom so far out you have no detail. As to watches, I now wear cheapo plastic watches, particularly Casios, that keep near perfect time, are very durable, come in an infinite number of styles, and you don't cry when it gets destroyed. I notice that young people don't wear watches at all--just smartphones for time. As a consequence, I get asked the time a lot by people on the street who can see I wear a watch and don't have access to their phones for some reason.
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Old 20 Sep 2021, 09:13 PM   #18
chrisretusn
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Originally Posted by TenFour View Post
I'm a sailor and I will be using paper charts until I am gone. Sure, I use electronic charting too, but on a small boat there is always the possibility of losing all power and electronics are never reliable. Plus, with a paper chart you can see at once a large geographic area in great detail, but with a small electronic screen you are very limited in how much you can see at once unless you zoom so far out you have no detail. As to watches, I now wear cheapo plastic watches, particularly Casios, that keep near perfect time, are very durable, come in an infinite number of styles, and you don't cry when it gets destroyed. I notice that young people don't wear watches at all--just smartphones for time. As a consequence, I get asked the time a lot by people on the street who can see I wear a watch and don't have access to their phones for some reason.
Paper charts are like a good book, the electronic variety just doesn't cut it. Never thought about zooming in on a chart, I guess there is a limit on resolution or detail.

I quite wearing watches a long time ago. I use to keep a cheap digital with the non-buckle strap connected for easy grabbing in my pocket. I don't wear jewelry at all, aside from my wedding band. When I was active duty working on ship, that came off and was placed in my locker until I let the ship. There are to many things that can ruin your life on board a ship when wearing jewelty or anything that conducts electricity. These days it's my cell phone that keep the time for me and yes, a few wall clocks.
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Old 20 Sep 2021, 09:25 PM   #19
TenFour
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There are to many things that can ruin your life on board a ship when wearing jewelty or anything that conducts electricity.
Yes! One reason I like the cheapo plastic Casios with plastic bands too. I've had a fancy metal band short out while working on the batteries onboard--not recommended! I find that I still check the wristwatch a lot even when carrying the cell phone in my pocket--much easier than pulling the phone out, and less chance then of dropping the phone.
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Old 22 Sep 2021, 06:50 PM   #20
chrisretusn
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Back in the mid eighties I I had a shipmate (a lucky one to boot) who got zapped from an arcing TWT tube while doing maintenance, he opened the access door on the side of the transmitter cabinet, the arc traveled about 12 inches to his watch through his hand to the cabinet door.
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