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Old 20 Jul 2019, 05:41 PM   #16
janusz
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Join Date: Feb 2006
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If (repeat: if) recruiters take the email address into account when evaluating applicants, they are much more likely to pay attention to the local_part (the bit to the left of @).

Something like [email protected] is unlikely to create a positive impression. Admittedly this may depend on the kind of the job....

Last edited by janusz : 20 Jul 2019 at 10:04 PM.
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Old 20 Jul 2019, 07:53 PM   #17
TenFour
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Apparently some people feel you need a good email address for job applications. https://www.job-hunt.org/federal-gov...mistakes.shtml
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Old 22 Jul 2019, 04:34 AM   #18
Tsunami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by webecedarian View Post
I donít want my own domain for this.
You don't have to if you're applying for jobs. The moment you'd run your own company (no matter how smile, like a webshop) or you're the employer, then it's a different story alltogether and an own domain makes it look all more professional. For a job application, I'm sure employers
a) look first and foremost to the content on your CV
b) will be very familiar with domains such as outlook.com, gmail.com, mail.com, and even hotmail.com and yahoo.com (as most people who go jobhunting don't even think that far about whether their email address could give a bad impression or not)


Quote:
Originally Posted by TenFour View Post
This infographic sums up the free options. https://miro.medium.com/max/1819/1*V...KOG6eh9Zw.jpeg
Funny but also somewhat exagerated (but I guess that's part of the joke).

Most Yahoo users I know, use it because they've used it for many years and simply don't see why they would change email addresses with the inconvenience of having to notify everyone of a new address + losing all stored email. A similar logic is often used by people who have been using the same Hotmail address for over 10 years. Not having to change address for over a decade can be very convenient, which most Yahoo users probably value.

Also, you sometimes just need a Yahoo account even if it's not entirely what you want. Signing up for a Flickr photo site requires a Yahoo account for example.


Quote:
Originally Posted by janusz View Post
If (repeat: if) recruiters take the email address into account when evaluating applicants, they are much more likely to pay attention to the local_part (the bit to the left of @).

Something like [email protected] is unlikely to create a positive impression. Admittedly this may depend on the kind of the job....
Exactly! Although I've seen job applicants who even use pseudonyms to the left of the @ which seem to be thought of during a night out in the pub. They somehow don't think that far that such address comes across unprofessional. (ironically, some of them still got the job)
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Old 22 Jul 2019, 04:52 AM   #19
TenFour
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Your email address should be right at the top of your cover letter and resume so it is bound to get noticed. Today it is very difficult for most people to get their own name at any major email service, making your own domain advantageous. Plus, having your own domain may make you appear more tech savvy than other applicants. I have various domains I use for various things, and I have had people comment on my email address when in interviews. With job applications the first step is to get noticed so you don't immediately get filed in the reject pile. Generally your cover letter is skimmed before your resume is looked at. Make your letter really good and your name, address, and email address will almost always be read before anything else. Of course, large companies ignore everything and feed it all into a computer that makes the first cuts.
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Old 23 Jul 2019, 06:32 AM   #20
EricG
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You haven't been able to sign up for Hotmail and Live accounts for years. If you do have one, you can create an outlook.com alias.

The only problem with just outlook.com is you can no long get short or common user names. I still have a 5 letter live.ca alias.
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Old 23 Jul 2019, 10:23 AM   #21
jeffpan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EricG View Post
You haven't been able to sign up for Hotmail and Live accounts for years. If you do have one, you can create an outlook.com alias.

The only problem with just outlook.com is you can no long get short or common user names. I still have a 5 letter live.ca alias.
I have some 3 letter aliases on hotmail.ca, hotmail.com.hk etc.
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Old 14 Aug 2019, 03:38 PM   #22
storystarry
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Quote:
Originally Posted by webecedarian View Post
I'm still having major problems posting (welcoming any suggestions for fixes), but if I can get this up...

Do you have preferences for email domain names that have nothing cute or trendy about them? I want something to use for job-related mail, and I really liked the plain rather formal name of Inbox.com, for instance. I dislike the major players, and, besides, names like Yahoo are too self-consciously cute. Download granny 2.0

And I need something that doesn't require a telephone to create. The formats of Hotmail are better for me than most, but, again, the Hotmail name is too cute.

Any ideas?
I would use a Gmail or Outlook.com address if it has to be free.
Both are used by everyone from ordinary users to CEOs.
Both are reliable and secure, which is the most important thing for a business address.
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Old 14 Aug 2019, 05:22 PM   #23
Dutchie007
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I think it is also dependable WERE and on WHAT kind of job you apply.

For most normal industry jobs your future boss will care less if you have an AOL or Yahoo account...and also most temp agencies dont care..many people use Gmail,Outlook and the likes. In Eastern Europe Yandex is pretty common to use..and in Turkey too.

Offcourse if you apply for vice-secretary of a national Bank or security chief at a nationawide supermarket chain.....and you send in your CV with something like "[email protected] or [email protected]"...I think they will have a good laugh and delete your email....LOL.

my 2 cents.

Dutchie.
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Old 15 Aug 2019, 12:13 AM   #24
Tsunami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutchie007 View Post
I think it is also dependable WERE and on WHAT kind of job you apply.

For most normal industry jobs your future boss will care less if you have an AOL or Yahoo account...and also most temp agencies dont care..many people use Gmail,Outlook and the likes. In Eastern Europe Yandex is pretty common to use..and in Turkey too.

Offcourse if you apply for vice-secretary of a national Bank or security chief at a nationawide supermarket chain.....and you send in your CV with something like "[email protected] or [email protected]"...I think they will have a good laugh and delete your email....LOL.

my 2 cents.

Dutchie.

while the CVs were not intended for a high position in a bank or so, I did see CVs with email addresses in it that were almost as silly as the examples you've given. In some cases the job application was succesful even.
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Old 16 Aug 2019, 11:17 PM   #25
pjwalsh
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Quote:
Originally Posted by webecedarian View Post
I gave up on my Fastmail when their terms changed, but maybe I should take another look.
Fastmail has a multitude of domains to choose from, increasing the odds of being able to use your own name. Some low-key, less used domain options: sent.com, ftml.net, fastem.com, fastmail.us, fastmail.org. Fastmail's subaddressing could be used to expand the [email protected] options.
https://www.fastmail.com/about/ourdomains

With gmail, having an address with your own name can be as simple as appending your country code, eg. [email protected]. Gmail ignores . in the username, so with or without, the address will find your inbox.

Whichever presentable email address you find, you could use it as a forwarding address to your service of choice.

Last edited by pjwalsh : 17 Aug 2019 at 11:16 PM.
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Old 26 Aug 2019, 08:12 PM   #26
TenFour
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Another thing to keep in mind is the necessity of using an email address that is really easy to type in and uses a .com or .org extension. If it is hard to type or spell your address will be entered incorrectly 50% of the time and you will miss out on messages. I manage some email lists and it is very difficult to decipher many addresses that are entered on forms, and often systems make it faster and easier to type in the address rather than cutting and pasting. If your address uses strange spelling and extensions it will be entered incorrectly a lot.
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Old 29 Aug 2019, 12:29 AM   #27
Tsunami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TenFour View Post
Another thing to keep in mind is the necessity of using an email address that is really easy to type in and uses a .com or .org extension. If it is hard to type or spell your address will be entered incorrectly 50% of the time and you will miss out on messages. I manage some email lists and it is very difficult to decipher many addresses that are entered on forms, and often systems make it faster and easier to type in the address rather than cutting and pasting. If your address uses strange spelling and extensions it will be entered incorrectly a lot.
I would say the person's local ccTLD is as good and logical as .com or .org. Maybe .net too.

I agree it is easier if the address is easy to type, but also it often comes across more professional if you use your real name. What if your real name is a tough one to type, for example because it is transliterated from a different alphabet or because your name is very uncommon in your country? I'd say using your real name, even in that situation, is still a better option than using a nickname. At least, if we talk about job related mails.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pjwalsh View Post
Fastmail has a multitude of domains to choose from, increasing the odds of being able to use your own name. Some low-key, less used domain options: sent.com, ftml.net, fastem.com, fastmail.us, fastmail.org. Fastmail's subaddressing could be used to expand the [email protected] options.
https://www.fastmail.com/about/ourdomains
Mail.com also has some domains to choose from that are not so common, some even work related (for example the neat workmail.com They also own the short and sweet dr.com domain)
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